37,731 Plays

mixtape2014:

Save this one for a night when all you want is for your brain to let you rest. Too often I go to bed, my body exhausted, my mind unable to stop moving. Luckily, there’s this masterful version of “Once Upon a December” from the (highly underrated) animated movie Anastasia. It’s a perfect piece to guide you to a peaceful slumber, because this music? It’s the stuff of dreams.

(via bemusedlybespectacled)

thevirginityslayer:

edwardspoonhands:

moeranda:

itseliberg33:

can she just get an award or something

I reblog this whenever it pops up on my dash.

So many directions she could have gone with this joke…out of infinite possibilities…she picked the best possible direction.

Best video in the world

(Source: aryanstark, via llimus)

wingsontheside:

moebiusloop:

Art by: L.D. Austin

Pahein, this is what would have happened if we went searching for griffin eggs.


Naw man I was thinking about it and if she’d seriously gone after a griffon a.) she’d probably just buy an egg or steal an baby that wasn’t being treated well and then b.) just raise it like a kid, not a mount.Or maybe not, but das my headcanon.

wingsontheside:

moebiusloop:

Art by: L.D. Austin

Pahein, this is what would have happened if we went searching for griffin eggs.

Naw man I was thinking about it and if she’d seriously gone after a griffon a.) she’d probably just buy an egg or steal an baby that wasn’t being treated well and then b.) just raise it like a kid, not a mount.

Or maybe not, but das my headcanon.

inevitablesurrender:

e2works:

Just tested some of this stuff: Pledge FloorCare!
Or as known by scale model-building oldtimers: Future Wax! (the name kept changing throughout the years, but the formula remains the same, if not, continually improving/does not yellow anymore)
If you’re a prop builder, scale model builder, figure garage kit builder, gunpla/gundam kit otaku builder, cosplayer, what have you, YOU NEED TO CHECK THIS OUT!
This stuff’s been popular for decades among scale model builders as a shinier, wetter, glossier, and ultimately EASY-AS-CAKE to apply clear coat! (EDIT: Forgot to mention! This is also great for sealing/protecting chrome and metallic paints! You know how ALL clear coats pretty much destroy and dull a chrome/gold/metallic finish? This won’t! This is one of its main reputations!)
You can apply it with either an air brush, foam brush, paint brush, towel, what have you! (EDIT: You can even DUNK parts in it! You can just DOUSE it like you’re blessing it with awesomeness!).  Its self-leveling properties are GODLIKE and it’s extremely forgiving! It’s kind of like applying shellac: just run through it once, working fast since it dries fast, and RESIST temptation to go over anything you missed (or you’ll get a run!). If you do get runs, gently DRY sand with 1500 or higher grit, and apply again! (EDIT: And another, probably easier way you can remove runs is using a q-tip soaked in ammonia/Windex and gently rub it until it’s gone!). That’s it! 1-2 coats is the standard! Dry time is about 8 hours, so just fire and forget!
And if you ever need to remove it, ammonia is all you need!
Got Windex?! That’s ammonia! Wipe away, and retry if you need to! Or if you just want to revitalize it after so many years! No sanding, easy, and quick!
Last but not least, it’s CHEAP! $6 for a supply that can last up to TEN LIFETIMES!
And if you want an even insane-er wet gloss, mix 4-5 parts Future with 1 parts Simple Green:

Apply like usual, but this time, make sure your item is covered from dust (since it becomes a super dust magnet!). 8 hours later, you uncover it and think, what the heck, it hasn’t dried?! But no, it’s dried—THAT’S WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE!
Future Wax!
Check it!
Here’s the scrap piece I tested: let it speak for itself! It’s even shinier than the area I buffed and treated with CAR POLISH!

Braindead easy to apply, no skills (well some, lol!) needed!
GET SOME.
As of this moment, a coat is drying on my Bakuzan blade; I can’t wait to show it off here!

Thought this might be useful to a few of you out there.  …And now I have to try it, too.

inevitablesurrender:

e2works:

Just tested some of this stuff: Pledge FloorCare!

Or as known by scale model-building oldtimers: Future Wax! (the name kept changing throughout the years, but the formula remains the same, if not, continually improving/does not yellow anymore)

If you’re a prop builder, scale model builder, figure garage kit builder, gunpla/gundam kit otaku builder, cosplayer, what have you, YOU NEED TO CHECK THIS OUT!

This stuff’s been popular for decades among scale model builders as a shinier, wetter, glossier, and ultimately EASY-AS-CAKE to apply clear coat! (EDIT: Forgot to mention! This is also great for sealing/protecting chrome and metallic paints! You know how ALL clear coats pretty much destroy and dull a chrome/gold/metallic finish? This won’t! This is one of its main reputations!)

You can apply it with either an air brush, foam brush, paint brush, towel, what have you! (EDIT: You can even DUNK parts in it! You can just DOUSE it like you’re blessing it with awesomeness!).  Its self-leveling properties are GODLIKE and it’s extremely forgiving! It’s kind of like applying shellac: just run through it once, working fast since it dries fast, and RESIST temptation to go over anything you missed (or you’ll get a run!). If you do get runs, gently DRY sand with 1500 or higher grit, and apply again! (EDIT: And another, probably easier way you can remove runs is using a q-tip soaked in ammonia/Windex and gently rub it until it’s gone!). That’s it! 1-2 coats is the standard! Dry time is about 8 hours, so just fire and forget!

And if you ever need to remove it, ammonia is all you need!

Got Windex?! That’s ammonia! Wipe away, and retry if you need to! Or if you just want to revitalize it after so many years! No sanding, easy, and quick!

Last but not least, it’s CHEAP! $6 for a supply that can last up to TEN LIFETIMES!

And if you want an even insane-er wet gloss, mix 4-5 parts Future with 1 parts Simple Green:

Apply like usual, but this time, make sure your item is covered from dust (since it becomes a super dust magnet!). 8 hours later, you uncover it and think, what the heck, it hasn’t dried?! But no, it’s dried—THAT’S WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE!

Future Wax!

Check it!

Here’s the scrap piece I tested: let it speak for itself! It’s even shinier than the area I buffed and treated with CAR POLISH!

Braindead easy to apply, no skills (well some, lol!) needed!

GET SOME.

As of this moment, a coat is drying on my Bakuzan blade; I can’t wait to show it off here!

Thought this might be useful to a few of you out there.  …And now I have to try it, too.

Anonymous Asked:
this casual weeabooism on tumblr is getting too much. almost all blogs I see use some weeaboo words to show how they're better than weeabbos and are totally ironic and joking around and like... you're not better? and it's not a small amount of people, it's starting to become almost everyone. including non asian sj people. why does everyone think it's acceptable?

thisisnotjapan:

Hipster racism.

Color, Chromophobia, and Colonialism: Some Historical Thoughts

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

I came across a very interesting article recently in regard to western society and the use of color, which explores colonial history and historical context.

But consider this: in the things that we make or buy, color tends to be reined in. While there are some rule-breakers out there, generally speaking, we think that bright colors are acceptable in limited doses, but too much vivid color can seem like an assault on the senses, or we just dismiss it as tacky.

For instance, it would be considered fashionable to wear a bright pink tie, so long as the suit is gray, but in general, we would find it eccentric or odd to wear a bright pink suit with a gray tie. And in terms of home decor, we’ve had plenty of heated debates about how tacky or inconsiderate it is to paint one’s home in a “loud” color, and it’s been reported that the most popular color for home exteriors is white.

Chromophobia is marked, not just by the desire to eradicate color, but also to control and to master its forces. When we do use color, there’s some sense that it needs to be controlled; that there are rules to its use, either in terms of its quantity or its symbolic applications (e.g., don’t paint your dining room blue because it suppresses appetite). Please note that I’m not arguing against color psychology; it’s undeniable that certain colors carry certain cultural assumptions and associations, a fact that has led anthropologist Michael Taussig to argue that color should be considered a manifestation of the sacred.

But what I am arguing is that there is a pervasive idea that color gets us in the gut: it’s seductive, emotional, compelling. Color, in the words of nineteenth-century art theorist Charles Blanc, often “turns the mind from its course, changes the sentiment, swallows the thought.”

According to some art critics, sensory anthropologists, and historians, this mutual attraction and repulsion to color has centuries-old roots, bound up in a colonial past and fears of the unknown.

Michael Taussig has recounted that from the seventeenth century, the British East India Company centered much of its trade on brightly colored, cheap, and dye-fast cotton textiles imported from India. Because of the Calico Acts of 1700 and 1720, which supported the interests of the wool and silk weaving guilds, these textiles could only be imported into England with the proviso that they were destined for export again, generally to the English colonies in the Caribbean or Africa.

These vibrant textiles played a key part in the African trade, and especially in the African slave trade, where British traders would use the textiles to purchase slaves. According to Michael Taussig, these trades are significant not only because they linked chromophilic areas like India and Africa, but also because “color achieved greater conquests than European-instigated violence during the preceding four centuries of the slave trade. The first European slavers, the Portuguese in the fifteenth century, quickly learned that to get slaves they had to trade for slaves with African chiefs and kings, not kidnap them, and they conducted this trade with colored fabrics in lieu of violence.” Ironically, many of these slaves were then put to work in the colonies cultivating plants like indigo, that yielded dyes whose monetary values sometimes surpassed that of sugar.

In England, contemporaries often called the Indian textiles “rags” or “trash” and scorned their bright colors, and in Europe more generally, bright colors were taken as a sign of degeneracy and inferiority. The German writer Goethe famously stated that “Men in a state of nature, uncivilized nations and children, have a great fondness for colors in their utmost brightness,” whereas “people of refinement” avoid vivid colors (or what he called “pathological colors”).

In short, a love of bright color marked one as uncivilized, as not possessing taste, as being “foreign” or other. Color represented the “mythical savage state out of which civilization, the nobility of the human spirit, slowly, heroically, has lifted itself — but back into which it could always slide” (Batchelor, 23).

This danger of descent, of falling into degeneracy, disorientation, and excess, resulted in a valorization of the “generalized white” mentioned above. According to Batchelor, prejudice against color “masks a fear: a fear of contamination and corruption by something that is unknown or appears unknowable,” and the highly minimal, white spaces of contemporary architecture mark an attempt to rationalize and strictly limit an interior, to stop its merging with the world outside.

The “hollow, whited chamber, scraped clean, cleared of any evidence of the grotesque embarrassments of an actual life. No smells, no noises, no colour; no changing from one state to another and the uncertainty that comes with it.”

Read More

You can also read subsequent conversations on this topic at medievalpoc here

pardonmybloomers:

Okay, so I spent a lot of time on these the last day or two, as a bit of therapy to get my mind off of things. So here’s five coords inspired by the five magical girls of Puella Magi Madoka Magica, inspired by a fanart post I reblogged recently.

Be prepared for the coord rundown here, there’s a lot of it. Top to bottom!

Madoka (with a sweet and simple coord):

  • AP Loire OP
  • AP Toe Shoes OTKs
  • BTSSB Cheryl Ribbon Comb
  • BTSSB Elie Crown bag
  • BTSSB Cherry Lace cuffs
  • AP Recital shoes
  • Soul Gem necklace via Animeshop
  • Bow ring via Modcloth
  • Bow earrings via Tradesy
  • GLW Baby Dollight wig in deep pink

Homura (inspired by her time powers):

  • RockStar Wigs Ombre Alexa in Pewter Silver Fade
  • Bodyline Antique Clock OP
  • AatP Milky Rail Train bag
  • VM Elegant Frill bolero
  • ETC Scallop Ribbon shoes
  • JM Victorian Border Diamond tights
  • Clock hand earrings via Etsy
  • Soul Gem necklace and ring set via Plamoya

Sayaka (focusing on the reason she became a magical girl):

  • IW A Maiden’s Prayer on a Starry Sky flare JSK+socks
  • AP Lucienne Dream blouse
  • BTSSB Tiered corset
  • IW Twin Ribbon and Rose headbow
  • BTSSB Ribbon Heart bag
  • ETC Patent Leather Ribbon shoes
  • Soul Gem necklace via Etsy
  • BTSSB The Angel Whispers Silent Night ring
  • Sepia Mystic wig in Cool Blue via Amphigory

Mami (with a dash of her love of tea):

  • IW Antique Tartan skirt
  • VM Lace Ribbon Puff Sleeve blouse
  • MM Long Lace cuffs
  • IW Toque Hat headdress
  • IW Gold Lame Horse OTKs
  • VM Victorian Short Boots
  • AP Tea Pot ring
  • AP Tea Cup ring
  • GLW Spiraluxe wig in Honeybee
  • Soul Gem necklace via Etsy

Kyoko (leaning a little EGA with crosses for her backstory and a tomboy ouji edge):

  • Meta Floral Jacquard Frill skirt
  • Atelier Boz Connor vest
  • Atelier Boz Zepar blouse
  • Verum Croix tights
  • AatP Cross Belt boots
  • AatP Crown Tassel headbow
  • Atelier Box 1 Point ear cuff
  • AatP Coffin Style Trunk pochette
  • Soul Gem necklace via Etsy
  • GLW Pixie collection ponytail 1 and bangs 2, in burgundy/brown mix

(via fyeahnerdylolitas)

myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.
Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.
What you’ll need:
circular knitting needles
yarn
small scales
You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.
Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!
(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)
Read More

myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.

Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.

What you’ll need:

  • circular knitting needles
  • yarn
  • small scales

You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.

Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!

(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)

Read More