twerks4loanpayments:

khadds:

plzstic:

akai-tori:

One of the best videos I’ve seen on this.

ZERO TOLERANCE

He’s the reason why I live sometimes

I literally had no idea this kind of stuff was happening on youtube at such a grand level. I’ve read racist comments and have seen questionable videos before but I never thought that it was so entrenched in not only the fans but also the youtubbers themselves. This is some very scary shit

(Source: sancty, via bemusedlybespectacled)

"If we think of the douchebag as a social identity as much as an accusation, as a subject with a distinctive persona locatable within the categories of race, class, gender and sexuality, then we find that the term carries a remarkably precise definition.
 
The douchebag is someone — overwhelmingly white, rich, heterosexual males — who insist upon, nay, demand their white male privilege in every possible set and setting.
 
The douchebag is always a white guy. But he is more than that. The douchebag is the demanding 1%, and the far more numerically significant class of white, heterosexist men who ape and aspire to be them. Wall Street guys are douchebags to be sure, but so is anyone looking to cash in on his white male privilege.
 
This narrowness of categorization — perhaps unique in the history of America’s rich history of racial and sexual slurs — is what makes the word douchebag such a potentially useful political tool."

Douchebag: The White Racial Slur We’ve All Been Waiting For — Medium

This is a great, interesting, insightful, long read.

(via quantumspork)

(via bemusedlybespectacled)

kitkatkatee:

i have some cute ass villagers

(via wheeljock)

werewolfau:

audible-smiles:

dsudis:

antoinetrips:

sansagrowingstrong:

allofthefeelings:

sugarfey:

freaoscanlin:

everyworldneedslove:

theladymonsters:

i’m waiting for someone to write epic meta on why the reason bucky is so popular with female fans is bc his storyline being about being stripped of agency and personal autonomy resonates particularly with female experiences

I think you… just did it?

Yeah, this must be why most of the fic on AO3 is written with really great Black Widow, who’s never sidelined, ignored, or turned into a series of Dad Jokes. Because her plotline is about the same things.

…..wait.

Or why there’s a tonne of fanworks and meta about Gamora.

I’m not discounting or dismissing female fans who find that Bucky’s narrative resonates with them. But I think there’s meta to be written about how this storyline of being stripped of agency and personal autonomy, a storyline that applies to at least two female characters in the MCU, was not considered narratively important until it happened to a white man.

Fandom is notorious for wanting storylines that resonate with female experiences but dismissing female characters, such that even when we have two women whose storylines match that they’re ignored in favor of the dude. And THEN fandom is notorious for writing long essays about how they like the male character because he represents their experience in ways they’ve never seen before, without ever acknowledging that women are having that same storyline in more explicitly gendered terms right there.

That’s fandom in a microcosm. And I’m pretty sure that’s the point theladymonsters was making.

All of the above is true, but I wouldn’t blame media consumers so much as media creators.

Bucky’s storyline and experience with losing agency and autonomy is played out in an extremely engaging way. The movies show his before, during, and (presumably and hopefully) will show his after.

Natasha’s loss of agency and autonomy isn’t explicitly shown in the movies like Bucky’s is. (I believe it’s played out in the comics but I don’t know for sure). We only get an ‘after’ of Natasha; the way that she’s trying to rebuild and recreate herself. Her story is aftermath, not process.

Gamora’s storyline was handled terribly. There’s a lot of much better meta than I could write about this, but suffice it to say that the main thing that I took from that movie was “dear god i wish the movie actually addressed Gamora and Nebula in any substantial way”. Gamora’s reaction to her loss of agency revolved around Quill, rather than herself, and therefore, I think, packed a lot less punch.

Point being, Bucky’s experience is the one fandom latches onto because it has the best source material. It elicits the most emotional response because it was explored more and better than the stories of the women. Because misogyny. 

#basically i don’t like blaming female fans for their engagement with media

For myself, I’ve made my peace with the fact that I want to work out all my issues of female experience on the bodies of male characters because it gives me a little distance from it. When those bad things happen to female characters, it’s too real, too close. I don’t want stories about women suffering violence and dehumanization; I want stories about women who are strong and fierce. I want stories about women who are as safe as I hope I am (and know I’m probably not). When I want a story about suffering and helplessness you’re damn straight I want it to be about a man, because I don’t want it to be about me.

(via bemusedlybespectacled)

k-times-two:

Painting practice! 

i made a thing!

k-times-two:

Painting practice! 

i made a thing!

nicerobotfriend:

i always see advice to artists from abled guys thats like “draw every day even on the days where you feel totally uninspired and like you cant even pick up a pencil” and i actually think that advice sucks and is terrible because some of us will spiral out of control into horrible depressive episodes if we force ourselves to draw on days where we feel terrible and end up with something less than spectacular so my advice to artists is “take breaks and love yourselves”

(via wheeljock)

gansmaltz:

neko-violet:

zerostatereflex:

Not everyone sees the same color when they stare at this spinning disk.
The gif is called, “Benham’s disk" "is named after the English toymaker Charles Benham, who in 1895 sold a top painted with the pattern shown. When the disk is spun, arcs of pale color, called Fechner colors or pattern-induced flicker colors (PIFCs), are visible at different places on the disk. Not everyone sees the same colors."
"The phenomenon originates from neural activity in the retina and spatial interactions in the primary visual cortex, which plays a role in encoding low-level image features, such as edges and spatiotemporal frequency components."
Fascinating how our brains work, I see a brown tan, what do you see? :D

light brown and yellow

olive green

Funny, I see my my favorite color: a cluster of foresty green-yellows. 

gansmaltz:

neko-violet:

zerostatereflex:

Not everyone sees the same color when they stare at this spinning disk.

The gif is called, “Benham’s disk" "is named after the English toymaker Charles Benham, who in 1895 sold a top painted with the pattern shown. When the disk is spun, arcs of pale color, called Fechner colors or pattern-induced flicker colors (PIFCs), are visible at different places on the disk. Not everyone sees the same colors."

"The phenomenon originates from neural activity in the retina and spatial interactions in the primary visual cortex, which plays a role in encoding low-level image features, such as edges and spatiotemporal frequency components."

Fascinating how our brains work, I see a brown tan, what do you see? :D

light brown and yellow

olive green

Funny, I see my my favorite color: a cluster of foresty green-yellows. 

(via raspingrabbit)

"

[W]e do need more incidental diversity, but it’s often seen as The One True Path to doing diversity right. Review after review praises books for their understated approach to diversity, saying how it’s not an “issue,” the diverse characters “just are,” and how wonderful it is that barely any comment was made about a certain character being queer/Black/a wheelchair user. Sometimes, books only hint at a character’s identity, or indicate it via a throwaway mention or two.

That approach works for some stories. It especially suits fantasy or science fiction settings where authors can build a world from scratch. In real life, though, marginalized people are affected … when [that isn’t] acknowledged in realistic fiction, I notice. When the absence of those elements is praised, I notice especially.

And I wonder — perhaps uncharitably — are diverse characters only OK as long as they’re not too diverse?

"

“Diverse characters: Corinne Duyvis on the decline of ‘issue’ books” by author Corinne Duyvis (Otherbound) at the Guardian

(via corinneduyvis)

I get very suspicious when creators go on and fucking on about how a character ‘just happens to be’ female or lgbtq or Poc or whatever.

Usually, it’s meant in good faith but sometimes it’s code for “I put no effort into this character whatsoever.”

(via gailsimone)

I definitely feel like this is something creators, particularly privileged creators like myself, have to be careful with. In my experience, it’s most important to recognize that in real life LGBT+ people and POC and women and PWD are in no way defined wholly by those traits but their experiences are informed by them and that shouldn’t be discounted. So don’t write Wheelchair Boy/Gay Girl/Asian Girl but don’t pull “oh yeah she’s got chronic anxiety and juvenile arthritis but they will never be mentioned again as she goes around the world solving crimes and fighting aliens HEY LOOK EVERYONE I WROTE A DISABLED CHARACTER.”

Obviously no one wants to write The Trans Woman/A Black Dude but the “they JUST HAPPEN to be X” often ends up falling into “colorblindness” territory-that is to say it sounds really good on the surface and if we lived in sociopolitical and historical vaccuum it would be great. But we don’t, so it ends up essentially saying “I have enough privilege to be oblivious to how these things impact someone’s life experience and I wrote the character as such.” Just something to consider.

(via geekygothgirl)

(via geekygothgirl)

knitmeapony:

theladymonsters:

there is this thing that fandom does, where fans who love female characters aren’t able to even discuss their flaws, to talk about the negative things they say or do, in a constructive way, because we’re too busy defending their right to fucking exist against people dumping all manner of hate on them

and it really sucks? i would love to have some nitty gritty conversations picking apart the ladies i love and viewing them as complex people

like wouldn’t it be nice if we could discuss sansa stark’s flaws without constantly having to sanctify her to people who think she deserves every single awful thing that’s happened in her life, but we are mired in a culture that only allows us to lavish nothing but positive attention on minority characters we love because everybody else is bound and determined to shit on them

we can’t even get a breath in to treat them as people because we’re too busy defending their right to exist

Yeah, there’s this thing I call the “at least we have” syndrome. It’s when you absolutely love and adore and protect something that in other venues you’d hardly acknowledge, much less like, because it’s all you’ve got. It used to be “at least we have ONE girl in the comic” and then it was “at least we have one girl on the team” and then it was “at least we have one girl on each side” and “at least we have two girls interacting.”

I know people who are slowly becoming feminists who get frustrated because I can say ‘Aw, yeah, the Avengers, at least we have Black Widow’ (and now there’s things like ‘at least we have May and Maria and Nat and Pepper being friends’ even though we’ve never seen it on screen).  And they say ‘how can you be happy about that’, and I can only say ‘ten years ago, we didn’t even have that, as problematic and obnoxious and compartmentalised and somewhat sexualized as it all is at least we have it.”  It’s not great, it’s not even good, but when your alternative is nothing or some kind of gross, crude, objectified caricature you treasure what you’ve got.

And it has been getting better.  Even the Bechdel Test is “at least we have two girls who have a life outside of men and show it” and now there are network TV shows and flagship comics titles that pass it.  And more recently, sometimes — when we’re lucky —  we can say things intersectionally. “At least we have one queer woman” and “at least we have one woman of color” and “at least we have one disabled woman” and it’s something, it’s agonizingly slow progress but it’s something and recognizing that is just a little bit of relief. 

It’s not happiness because we shouldn’t have to ‘at least we have’ and we can and should expect so much better but sometimes after endlessly feeling let down, ‘at least we have’ is a goddamned glorious victory.

(via bemusedlybespectacled)